Herb Profile: Rosemary

uses and benefits of rosemary leaf Herb Profile: Rosemary

Rosemary is an aromatic in the mint family that grows on an evergreen bush. It is most often used in cooking but has a wonderful woodsy scent and is also great in air fresheners and aromatherapy mixes.

Concentrated extracts like Rosemary Oil should be used externally, though the dried herb can be taken internally when used in cooking. It is an especially great herb to add to meats (and pairs well with lamb). Some research suggests that it has anti-cancer properties.

Uses:

  • Rosemary can be infused into an oil and used externally for skin irritations like eczema and joint problems like arthritis
  • It has also been reported to speed healing of wounds and bruises when used externally
  • Internally, it is best added to foods as a cooking spice, though a mild tea of Rosemary Leaf can help fight illness when sipped
  • A strong infusion of Rosemary and Nettle leaf is an excellent herbal rinse for hair and can help get rid of dandruff and speed hair growth when used after each washing
  • Rosemary infused oil is an intensive treatment for bad dandruff of hair loss and can be rubbed on hair, left for at least an hour and washed out- this really improves scalp condition!
  • Rosemary Oil can be used externally in times of illness to speed recovery by rubbing on the feet or any areas that are sore
  • My favorite natural air-freshener is to put a small handful of Rosemary Leaf, 1 sliced lemon or orange, and a splash of vanilla into a sauce pot and simmer on low all day (watch the water levels)- It smells amazing and freshens the house for days
  • Though I haven’t tried it, Rosemary supposedly deters small pests like mice. Several people have recommended tucking small sprigs of dried Rosemary into the backs of cabinets to ward of mice and rats during the winter.
  • Rosemary is also helpful in warding off smaller pests like mosquitos and is an ingredient in my Homemade Bug-Off Bars
  • Rosemary Antioxidant Extract is a very effective natural preservative that can extend the shelf life of homemade lotions, cosmetics or other homemade body products
  • Used externally, Rosemary Oil can help sooth the stomach and relieve pain from indigestion, menstrual cramps or other difficulties
  • Pregnant women should not use Rosemary in large amounts (cooking is fine) and should avoid the essential oils.

 Ever used Rosemary for something other than cooking? Tell me about it!

Reader Comments

  1. Stephanie says

    I love this! I grew up in a country where out of necesity moms and grandmas are equiped with lots of “natural medicine” knowledge and as I’m switching to a greener/natural life I find myself connecting with my grandma (as she is no longer with us). Anyway, one more use for you: my mom used to bath us in rosemary water (just add fresh leaves to the boiling water than add to bath water) for fevers, and it would bring the fever down right away!

  2. says

    I just picked up a natural deodorant cream with rosemary and mint! I was waiting on my shea/cocoa butters and beeswax so I could make your recipe when I spotted a locally made version that was somewhat similar and has gotten me through lol! At any rate, she says the rosemary helps as an antibacterial agent, I think? I don’t know, but it smells LOVELY!

  3. Oneawesomebunch says

    I have picked Rosemary from my bush
     and rubbed in my hands and then rubbed my arms and legs to work in the garden and so far no misquito bites and usually I can’t go outside without getting bites. This also has worked on my Gran Angels!

  4. Robert Vandyk says

    When I grill meat over charcoal or when using the gas grill I drop two or three branches of rosemary into the center. I grow two pots in our garden of rosemary. Rosemary smokes on the charcoal and in the gas grill it smokes for a while then burst in to flame. It adds to the flavor of the cooked foods. This Works Great with trout and salmon. This also works great in campfires as well. Its gives a taste like we took the spice rack with us and the rosemary braches travel good in a one quart zip top bag. We can’t do that with fresh sweet basil or fresh oregano which we take only dried.

Join the Conversation...

Your email address will not be published. Please read the comment policy.