DIY Herbal Hair Rinse for Shiny and Strong Hair

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How to make an herbal hair rinse
Wellness Mama » Blog » Beauty » DIY Herbal Hair Rinse for Shiny and Strong Hair

Plenty of hair care commercials promise shiny, beautiful hair, but at what cost? This DIY herbal hair rinse recipe nourishes the scalp, boosts shine, and strengthens hair naturally without the downsides of chemicals and parabens.

The problem with many hair care items, even many of the natural ones, is that they strip the natural oils from the hair. Many shampoos also contain ingredients that coat the hair for that smooth, silky feel, to replace the oils it’s just stripped. It’s a frustrating cycle… but there are other ways!

This herbal hair rinse features nutritive herbs that feed the scalp for healthier, stronger hair. The apple cider vinegar softens and cleanses, without removing the scalp’s natural oils. This rinse easily fits into a no-poo lifestyle but can also be used with shampoo. With regular use, hair may even go longer between washes (always a plus!).

Herbal Hair Rinse: The Herbs

This rinse is infused with beneficial herbs that help hair in a variety of ways:

Horsetail (Yes, Horsetail!)

This favorite herb of mine contains high amounts of silica to strengthen hair strands (which is why I also use it in my hair mask recipe!). Many shampoos contain silicon to coat the hair but this only copies the effect. Horsetail is also rich in calcium, magnesium, bioflavonoids, chromium, potassium, copper, and iron to name a few.

Horsetail is also slightly astringent, which is helpful for oily hair.

Lavender and Rosemary

Lavender calms inflammation on the scalp and increases circulation for better growth. Rosemary herb also affects circulation and stimulates growth. Like horsetail, rosemary is also slightly astringent, which works to strengthen the hair follicles and prevent hair loss.

Nettle

Nettle is really a wonder herb as it’s full of vitamins and minerals. You’ll find vitamin A carotenoids, vitamins B, C, D, and K, as well as calcium, magnesium, boron, chromium, silica, and others. By nourishing and increasing the health of the scalp, nettle makes hair naturally stronger and more vibrant.

Basil

Basil is the last herb used in this mix and it plays a special role. Like the other herbs, basil feeds the scalp, but it also helps the body to remove toxins and heavy metals. Basil promotes hair growth as it nourishes with vitamins A and C, flavonoids, and polyphenolic acids.

How to make an herbal hair rinse
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3.70 from 23 votes

Herbal Hair Rinse Recipe

While this hair rinse takes a bit of time to make, it’s relatively easy, and can work wonders on your hair!
Prep Time5 minutes
Infusing Time14 days
Author: Katie Wells

Materials

Instructions

  • Add all of the dried herbs to a quart-size glass jar.
  • Cap the jar and shake to mix, or stir with a spoon.
  • Fill the jar to 1 inch from the top with apple cider vinegar.
  • Cap it tightly, and shake vigorously.
  • Keep the jar in a cool, dark location for 2-4 weeks, shaking it every day or so.
  • After the first few days you may notice that the herbs have absorbed some of the vinegar. Just top your jar off with some more vinegar so that it stays about 1 inch from the top.
  • After 2-4 weeks, then strain the herbs out with a cheesecloth or a very clean old t-shirt fabric. You can also strain it with a fine mesh sieve, then line your sieve with a coffee filter and run it through again.
  • Store your herbal hair rinse in a clean glass jar.

To Use:

  • After cleaning hair as usual, mix equal parts of the prepared herbal hair rinse and water together in an empty mason jar or other container. Use ¼ cup of each for short hair, ½ cup of each for shoulder-length hair, and ? cup of each for long hair.
  • Tip your head back and slowly pour the herbal rinse through your hair.
  • Tilt your head from side to side and work your fingers through it as you pour to help it reach all areas.
  • You can leave the herb rinse in, or wash it out briefly with water.

Notes

Use the herbal rinse once a week or even every day according to preference.
Use this hair rinse in between shampoo sessions, or even in place of them if you find that works for you.
Do not mix the prepared herbal vinegar with water until ready to use, as it will decrease shelf life.

Store your herbal hair rinse in a clean glass jar. When you go to use it, dilute it with 1 part of filtered water. The vinegar concentrate will keep indefinitely; however water will encourage mold and bacterial growth, so don’t store the rinse pre-diluted with water.

How to Use Your Herbal Hair Rinse

After cleaning hair as usual, mix equal parts of the prepared herbal hair rinse and water together in an empty mason jar or other container. The following guidelines should give you a good idea of how much herbal hair rinse to use each time. You may need less or more rinse depending on the length and thickness of your hair.

  • Short hair: ¼ cup infused vinegar to ¼ cup water
  • Shoulder-length hair: ½ cup infused vinegar to ½ cup water
  • Long hair: 2/3 cup infused vinegar to 2/3 cup water

Tip your head back and slowly pour the herbal rinse through your hair. Tilt your head from side to side and work your fingers through it as you pour to help it reach all areas.

You can leave the herb rinse in, or wash it out briefly with water.

Additional Tips

  • Use the herbal rinse once a week or even every day according to preference.
  • Use this hair rinse in between shampoo sessions, or even in place of them if you find that works for you.

Have you ever used an herbal rinse? Did you notice a difference in your hair? Let me know in the comments!

This easy DIY herbal hair rinse will take your beauty routine to the next level and give you shiny, healthy hair with the natural power of herbs!
Katie Wells Avatar

About Katie Wells

Katie Wells, CTNC, MCHC, Founder of Wellness Mama and Co-founder of Wellnesse, has a background in research, journalism, and nutrition. As a mom of six, she turned to research and took health into her own hands to find answers to her health problems. WellnessMama.com is the culmination of her thousands of hours of research and all posts are medically reviewed and verified by the Wellness Mama research team. Katie is also the author of the bestselling books The Wellness Mama Cookbook and The Wellness Mama 5-Step Lifestyle Detox.

Comments

45 responses to “DIY Herbal Hair Rinse for Shiny and Strong Hair”

  1. Yoli Avatar

    This says chamomile tea rinse but there is no chamomile in the recipe. Am I on the wrong link? Thank you

    1. Jamie Larrison Avatar

      I’m not sure where you’re seeing chamomile tea rinse? Are you coming to this recipe from a Pinterest pin? Chamomile tea does make a good hair rinse though!

  2. lynnea Avatar

    3 stars
    I would also be careful and get some PH strips. Your ACV rinse should be around 4 PH (ACV is naturally at 2 which is pretty acidic) so that it doesn’t cause long term damage to your hair and to your scalps natural layer and sebum production. Once you get the water dilution recipe from that first time, you know how much to use to dilute it in the future. People cause alot of damage because they do not understand how PH acidity affects hair. The higher the PH (basic), the more it will dry out and frizz up your cuticles, making it unruly and not easily manageable, and the lower the PH (acidic), the tighter the cuticle and also the easier it will take to break your hair. I give three stars since this information is super important and random dilution methods are not as safe for people.

  3. Lili Avatar

    Made this. I use it every time I wash my hair, which is every other night. I’ve noticed my hair feels softer with more volume. Also, if I don’t wash my hair my scalp would be itchy and oily if I didn’t use this hair rinse. Thanks for this. I do have to use a bit of conditioner as a detangler before using the rinse. I love this hair rinse. Did I say that already? Lol.

  4. Megan Avatar

    I have been using this for 2 months and have noticed a lot of new hair growth. (I have dry thin hair). The smell isnt awesome, but I dont mind too much and like another commenter said a rose or lavender hydrosol definitely covers it – even without the smell is gone for me after a few hours. I’ve also noticed I can go longer between washes when I use this. Hair is less frizzy, more full and feels/looks much healthier!! Thanks for the recipe!

  5. Ana Avatar

    Rosemary can darken hair; its often used to combat greying. Caution should be used if that’s not the desired effect!

  6. Beth Avatar

    I would love to try this, but I am allergic to a lot of grasses and I’m concerned about the horsetail, which seems to be described as a grass and an herb. I can’t really tell if it’s technically a kind of grass or not. Any thoughts on this? Thanks!

  7. Liana Avatar

    This is amazing. Do they need to be dried herbs? I have all of these growing wild and fresh in my backyard. Can I use them fresh instead of waiting for them to dry? I was also thinking about adding peppermint.. thoughts on the hair benefits or negatives there?

    1. Julie Avatar

      when using fresh herbs to infuse oils, I follow this process to wilt them prior to infusion, which removes enough moisture from the plant material to inhibit mold and bacterial growth (credit to Stephanie L Tourles from “Hands on Healing Remedies”):
      – pick approximately double the amount of dried herb called for to allow for shrinkage
      – tear or shred the herb to expose more surface area for even drying
      – spread on a clean screen, pillowcase, or paper towel in a warm, still location that is mostly shaded and protected from wafting animal dander, dust, and flies
      – allow to sit for 24-48 hours (you should notice a distinct change in texture from firm/fresh to limp/soft/leathery)

      Then you should be good to go! Good luck 🙂

  8. Kimberly Avatar
    Kimberly

    Nettle leaf or nettle root? I’m assuming nettle leaf but want to be sure before I order dried herbs…

  9. Marisa Avatar

    Is this rinse safe during pregnancy? I heard that rosemary should be avoided in pregnancy. Thanks!

  10. MamaMoon Avatar

    Do you know of it will strip color from hair? I use a veggie base color…I’d love to go back to no poo!!!
    Thank you, I’m loving your blog!!

  11. Brigitte Holiday Avatar
    Brigitte Holiday

    Hey Mama! I just wanted to let you know about the amazing benefits of fermented rice water for your hair. I’ve been using is as a wash (after shampoo and conditioner) in the shower, letting is sit for 5 minutes. It greatly has improved the condition of my hair.

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