Healthy Probiotic Marshmallows

Healthy Homemade Marshmallow Recipe Can even add probiotics these are healthy and kids love them Healthy Probiotic Marshmallows

We don’t do candy and for the most part, we avoid sweets, but sometimes I let my kids have sweet treats, especially if we are going to be somewhere that junk food is abundant and I want a healthier alternative for them.

This is how my homemade marshmallows came about… The kids actually got the idea from a cooking show they saw, and since I was not going to use the corn syrup and sugar that the TV recipe suggested, the experimenting began.

I have several qualifications if I’m going to serve sweets to my kids:

  1. All of the ingredients have to come from healthy sources and not be chemically made in any way
  2. It must also have some health boosting properties (like Gelatin, probiotics, etc.)
  3. It must taste good

With those in mind, I started experimenting. I had a few failed batches that luckily still tasted good and could be used as a marshmallow cream, but I finally found a recipe that I was happy with (and so were the kids).

I also love that this recipe contains all GAPS friendly ingredients, so even my son who we are working on reversing a dairy allergy in can have them. The gelatin and optional probiotics are gut soothing and supportive of skin, hair and nail growth!

UPDATE: I recently figured out how to add Marshmallow Root to these marshmallows. This not only makes them more authentic, but marshmallow root is very soothing for sore throats and congestion so the combination of this with probiotics can help give an immune boost! Marshmallow Root can also be made in to a hot tea or cool infusion that is soothing during illness. Many herbalists also recommend Marshmallow Root for UTIs, heartburn, and indigestion for its soothing properties.

4.5 from 11 reviews
Healthy Probiotic Marshmallows
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Healthy marshmallows made with honey instead of sugar. Can even add probiotics for the health benefits!
Author:
Recipe type: Dessert, Snack
Cuisine: American
Serves: 6
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Optional Step: Combine 1 cup of warm water with the 1 tablespoon of Marshmallow Root and let sit for 5 minutes (or as long as overnight in the fridge), Stir well and strain. Make sure that the liquid makes a while cup.
  2. Pour ½ cup of water(marshmallow mix if you used it) into the metal bowl or mixer bowl and add the gelatin. Whisk slightly to incorporate and let sit.
  3. Pour the other ½ cup of water and the 1 cup of honey into the small saucepan.
  4. Slowly bring the water and honey mixture to a boil. If you have a kitchen thermometer, you want it to reach at least 240 degrees. If not, just keep boiling, stirring constantly for 8 minutes.
  5. Slowly start pouring the honey/water mixture into the bowl with the gelatin mix (which will be hardened by now).
  6. Turn on the mixer or hand mixer and keep on medium as the honey mixture is added.
  7. When add honey mix is added, turn the mixer to high and blend with the mixer for another 10-15 minutes or until it forms a stiff cream the consistency of marshmallow cream (it should form gentle peaks).
  8. Add the probiotics and any flavor ingredients for the last 2 minutes of mixing (except cocoa powder which can be added to the honey mix in the saucepan).
  9. Grease a 9x13 inch baking dish with coconut oil, or line with parchment paper, leaving some on the sides to be able to pull up.
  10. When marshmallows are whipped, pour into the lined/greased dish and smooth evenly.
  11. Let sit at least 4 hours (overnight is better).
  12. Flip on to a cutting board and cut with a well oiled pizza cutter or knife.
  13. Store in an airtight container.
Notes
Do NOT store in the fridge as they will melt. Store in an airtight container at room temperature. The probiotics will decrease the shelf life to 3-4 days. Without the probiotics, these will last 2-3 weeks on the counter.

Have you ever made a dessert like this? Will you try these? What flavors would you add? Share below!

Reader Comments

  1. says

    Wonderful! My kids were begging me for marshmallows at the store the other day. We will definitely make these soon. I made some years ago, but they were the typical unhealthy version. Very impressed with this recipe! Thanks so much for sharing! I love it!

  2. Chelsey Huttinga says

    my recipe is almost identical to this but I never thought of putting probiotics in them, what a great idea! Thanks!

  3. says

    I need to try this as a way to get probiotic into my son’s system. He’s a VERY picky eater, and I have a hard time getting him to try new things. Maybe he’ll try these though. Thanks so much.

    • Ashley Skidmore says

      My kids can be very picky too. It’s like every highly processed and sugary thing out there is all they want. Another good way to give your child probotics is in their drinks. I can’t get my sons to eat chewables so I buy the powder that you keep in the fridge (which they carry at my local health food stores) and mix it in their favorite drink. Some stores have ones especially for kids but if not the adult probotics usually have age dosing and you’d cut the dose in half from 1 teaspoon to a 1/2 a teaspoon most likely.

  4. says

    I love that this has healing ingredients like gelatin and probiotics! How creative! Plus it’s GAPS and egg free? I think I will be trying these this afternoon!

  5. Kristy Kelley says

    I’m curious how you’re trying to reverse your son’s milk allergy? With the full GAPS diet? I am waiting for my GAPS diet book to arrive and hopefully will be able to do this with my son as I think he has dairy and wheat sensitivities. I definitely know he has severe egg allergy.

  6. John says

    Sort of disappointed … was hoping it actually had real marshmellow root or something in it. But still a better alternative to the regular ones :)

  7. Kaarin Puhala says

    Made a batch of these today and also a double-batch of your homemade jello. So my question is – what else do you use the gelatin for? I purchased two containers of it on amazon, and not sure what else I can use it for. Would love your suggestions.

        • Angela Vullo says

          Yes, from animal bones. That’s why it has so many health benefits. Making broth from bones is so nutritional and would help feed families when they didn’t have many options. Humans have been living off of animals for thousands of years!

          • Michelle Wallick says

            Just because bone broth has so much nutrients, doesnt mean the collagen from the bones (gelatin) is going to carry all those nutrients also.

          • Angela Vullo says

            Humans have been using bones to get nutrients for thousands of years. They would put the bones in a pot over a fire and use the broth for days when they didn’t have meat. It would provide them with the nutrients they needed. That is why this method is still used today. Just curious, but why do you believe this not to be true?

          • Michelle Wallick says

            Im not disputing the health benefits of bone broth, only pointing out that gelatin by itself isnt going to contain all the same good stuff thats in bone broth, like iron and such.

            “Although gelatin is 98-99% protein by dry weight, it has less nutritional value than many other complete protein sources. Gelatin is unusually high in the non-essential amino acids glycine and proline (i.e., those produced by the human body), while lacking certain essential amino acids (i.e., those not produced by the human body).” <-wikipedia

          • Angela Vullo says

            I see what you mean. I don’t plan to use this as a complete protein source or even for its nutrients, especially for making marshmallows and fruit snacks. I will give my kids bone broth if I want to achieve that. The fact that it’s healthy and not something like corn syrup is why I think so highly of it and enjoy using it in recipes like this.

  8. says

    I have successfully made marshmallows for a while now, using similar recipes, however recently they’ve started separating…I was surprised to read your comment about putting them in the fridge makes them melt – surely it should make them too hard? Could putting in the fridge cause the separation I’m experiencing?

  9. says

    My daughter & I made these today, and the taste is great! When I tried spreading it in the glass dish, it was a big fluff ball that wouldn’t spread. It’s just a gelatinous mass. Do you think I mixed it too long? That’s what I’m thinking. Oh well, we’re still going to enjoy our ugly marshmallow ball!!!

  10. Natalie says

    I loooove that you added probiotics to marshmallows. Genius! Any chance you could recreate something like this? http://www.braintoniq.com/braintoniq/ I know I can make tea with some of the herbs, and I could use honey to sweeten, but I don’t know how to get the powdered stuff to work in a drink. I guess just put it in and shake it up a lot? I have a very picky teenager. We do have a SodaStream so I can use that to carbonate it.

    • says

      Yes, but I’d stir in the other ingredients at the end of the mixing process for the marshmallows before the set instead of re-melting them like the traditional recipe…

  11. Sue Mosier says

    I made a recipe similar to your recipe. The honey flavor was very intense. Do your marshmallows taste similar to the store brand?

    • says

      Try another type of honey.

      Honey has a large variety of flavors, depending on what flower the bees have frequented.
      Typically the color will give an idea of the intensity of flavor..
      Some honeys are nearly clear, only a slight color.. They tend to be very sweet with very little flavor…
      And some honeys are as dark as molasses, with very strong flavors.

      • Feingold says

        Can you use Raw Honey? The honey we buy is almost solid in 32 oz glass jars from the farmer, and if you want it liquid you need to melt it.

        Do you know if the quality of marshmallows is affected by the raw honey?

          • Anya says

            Hi Katie,

            It’s a grate recipe, my concern, though, is honey boiling aspect. As far as I know honey becomes poisoness when being boiled. It only hold 40 degrees Celsius.
            I wish there was some articles that prove other, for I know a lot of tasty recipes with boiled honey :( May be you would know some?!

            Thank you for your precious time working on this grate blog!
            Anya

  12. Kristy Tillman says

    Could you do this with the same amount of pure maple syrup instead of honey? It is the only sweetener we can use due to allergies. We have tons of raw local honey and can’t use it. :)

  13. leah says

    What kind of probiotics did you use? Do you use great lakes gelatin or something else? What if I wanted to use my own gelatin from a broth or something? (because it’s hard to find organic gelatin, much less grass-fed).

  14. Loren Anthony says

    Hey Wellness Mama I’m new to your blog and I love it! It’s right up my alley! Can you explain why gelatin is considered a health boosting property? Thanks!

  15. Victoria Bomberry says

    We made these today and they came out perfect!

    Can it be made “raw” by not boiling the water/honey mixture? Is the boiling to kill bacteria or required to get the marshmallow-y texture?

    Thanks for sharing!

  16. says

    If you let the marshmallow root sit overnight cold water it will be more slippery and you’ll get more health benefits. A few plants like cold water soaks marshmallow is one. I can’t wait to try this! Your blog is amazing thanks for all your hard work

  17. Rebecca says

    I am so excited to give these a try!! I’d love to use coconut sugar since it is lower in fructose than honey. Have you tried this before? And if so, did you need to adjust the amount of sweetener and/or water?
    Thank you so much!

  18. bela says

    I made these over the weekend using honey and some concentrated pineapple juice I made and they came out pretty good. The pineapple juice had been cooked so it disabled the papain. I wonder if I might have overdone the mixing because they are very airy. I’m just getting into natural foods so I also used regular store-bought gelatine and that may have affected the texture. My hubby called it “marshmallow tofu” LOL!

  19. Debbie says

    Hi! Do you use the actual root or powdered Marshmallow? I’m not sure which to order. Thank you! Debbie

  20. Jessica Depta says

    I meant to order marshmallow root, but I accidentally got the powder instead. How can I use this in the recipe?

  21. Amy B says

    I have a container of the Great Lakes Gelatin Collagen Hydrolysate (in the green canister), it’s the one that is supposed to dissolve in hot or cold liquids. Will this work for this recipe or do u think I need to get the regular gelatin?

  22. Ginger Hindman Toler says

    Hi Katie! Loved listening to you on the Real Food Con Summit! It certainly inspired me to visit your site and try some of your recipes–especially the child oriented ones. So, my daughter and I attempted this yummy recipe yesterday. I followed your directions and things looked good, but on checking them this morning, they have melted:(. Where did I go wrong? A few things that may help that I have considered: we live in the mountains, my mixer is ancient, I loosely sat a lid on the top before bed? Thanks!

  23. sabrina says

    Hi Katie,
    Is it possible to make these with agar agar flakes instead of gelatin? My daughters birthday is coming up this weekend and I want to make some healthy sweet treats, as she typically doesn’t have any i want to make an exception on her special day.
    Many thanks,

    Sabrina

  24. Natasha says

    Hi, this recipe looks amazing. However, I am vegan and was wondering if there is a healthy alternative to grass-fed gelatin. Thank You.

  25. Jen says

    Thanks! I have been looking everywhere for a marshmallow recipe that uses actual marshmallow root, so I was happy to find this. I’d still like to find a recipe that uses only marshmallow root sometime, just out of curiosity for what the “original” was like.

  26. Tasha says

    When I was at work today we were talking about all the awful things we liked to eat as kids. One of the things that came up were Viva Puff cookies. (I don’t know if they are a Canadian thing or not, but they are a cookie with a dab of jam, a marshmallow on top and then dipped in chocolate.) Anyways, I was challenged to try to make a healthy version of this cookie. I am going to try out your marshmallow recipe and see how I can go from there. Wish me luck!!! The people at my work are not on the same page as I am–yet!!!!

    Thanks for posting. :)

  27. Valerie says

    I used half honey and half maple syrup. I too was worried about the overpowering honey flavor. Turns out I could still really taste the honey. Which is not bad but not really a marshmallow flavor. But when they were all done setting up I sprinkle them with a mixture of arrowroot powder cinnamon and salt. It seemed to neutralize the honey flavor. I also had a gelatinous clump of goo instead of flat marshmallows. So I made some cookie cutter shapes and then used the rest of the globs for organic rice krispie treats. You can re heat the marshmallows it does
    work fine. Thank you Wellness Mama for the recipe! :)

  28. Andrea says

    Do you think you could substitute the gelatin with agar powder and the honey with either agave or pure maple syrup to make these vegan? I have been looking for a good vegan marshmallow recipe but they all seem to involved for the time I am willing to put into them. Hah. This recipe looks really simple and I was just curious. I might have to try those alterations and see if they work. Hmmm :)

  29. Kassaundra says

    I was reading your recipe and I noticed you are heating the honey to a very high temp. I’m very interested in using honey as an alternative in most of everything that I make. Though in some cases it is very difficult to do this. Once raw honey (the beneficial honey) is heated to above boiling, it literally loses all nutritional value, I’ve actually heard in the case of Ayurveda, it is believed that honey heated over 60 degrees Celsius (140 degrees Fahrenheit) creates “ama”. Ama is a condition of mucus that is brought on by inflammation and toxicity. Regardless, once honey is heated it is no different from regular sugar. Since you seem to be into the less sugar intake diet, I figured I would let you know. Lately, I’ve been heating honey under 100 degrees C to test at what temps honey is no longer nutritional. To do this, just heat the honey – once you have reached a specified temp. remove the honey from the heat and let it sit until it crystallizes ( you must do this with RAW honey); this can take weeks, months, or even years (my raw honey generally crystallizes in a month or two). If it does not crystalize the honey is no longer nutritionally beneficial. There are a lot of no bake honey treats, which I enjoy snacking on, available! If you truly want to eat healthy sweets, try not heating the honey to such high temps. By the way, I’m really excited to try your marshmallow recipe out (I live to eat s’mores)! I hope I can figure out how I can make it without heating the honey to such a high temp.

    • Jeanne says

      It’s true, if you are going to heat raw honey, you might as well use sugar, as you have killed all the beneficial enzymes and it is no longer healthy.

      The whole point of eating raw honey is that it is unheated!

  30. april dulac says

    i only mixed the end product for about 5min and it was too thick to spread out nicely would u think just mixing enough at the end just to blend it all so then it can be spread out good?

  31. Colleen Elisabeth Chao says

    I made these this weekend to send with my 2.5-year-old son for his first camping trip with dad and the boys. :) Not only did he love them, but so did uncles, grandpa, and cousin! My husband raved about them! I stuck the leftovers in the freezer, and they’ve kept their shape perfectly! Thank you for this fabulous recipe, Katie!!!

  32. Kirsten says

    I just made these and the recipe worked perfectly. I let them set up for about an hour before cutting them (I found kitchen shears worked better than a knife for cutting, since I don’t have a pizza cutter) I tossed them in arrowroot starch so they don’t stick together. I also didn’t have enough honey, so I used maple syrup to get the rest of the 1 cup of sweetener. They are a little maple-y but very tasty. However, I find them to be VERY sweet. Much sweeter than even store-bought marshmallows. Maybe it’s because my tastes have changed and I’m more sensitive to sweet flavors now, but I was shocked at how sweet they were. Any ideas on how to make them less sweet? I think a lot of the water evaporated while the honey mixture came up to 240 degrees.

  33. Michele says

    Just made these and they were delicious! I used half honey, half maple syrup and it worked great. I think next time I’ll mix it less than ten minutes because I had trouble spreading it in my pan and it doesn’t look too pretty. I also used them for peanut butter rice crispy treats and melted after I was done mixing (I was afraid to stop halfway through and not be able to start it back up) and that also worked out great. Thanks so much for the recipe! My family will be picking at these for a while :)

  34. Hannah says

    I LOVE THIS!! You have amazing values. It is so important to teach the younger generation the important of natural and healthy foods instead of allowing them to eat chemicals and processed garbage. Thank you for the recipe!!!

  35. Kelly says

    Does the Marshmallow root add to the taste in this recipe, it says optional so Im guessing not. I don’t have this on hand.

  36. Donna says

    Should I use marshmallow root, marshmallow root powder, or marshmallow root extract? Do they all have the same benefit, or does one desaulve better into the jello?I’ve never used it before so not sure what one to buy. Thanks!

  37. Camilla says

    I’m curious, you say “grass-fed gelatin” and give a link, but the container in the link does not say anything about grass-fed. Usually they are really keen to promote that. Have you done research into this particular brand and know that it is grass-fed?
    Thank you for your wonderful site! We have used it for so many things, and shared it with our friends. :-)

  38. Maria says

    Katie- you said in this article you are trying to reverse a milk allergy? Can you share with me how you are trying to accomplish this? Thanks so much

  39. McKenna says

    Made these today with a raw honey that gave them a lovely faint caramel color; also used vanilla bean (use 1/2 the amt of vanilla called for when using ground beans). I mixed mine a bit too long but I used a reusable parchment paper on top of them and spread with my hands to press them out

  40. Anya says

    Hi Katie,
    I was curious does not honey become poison when boiled? I’ve read that it could be raised only to 40 C. It is my internal “sadness” :) I’m always looking for a healthier way instead of sugar in recipes but honey seems even worse when boiled.
    Thank you.

  41. Jeanne says

    Great recipe. But instead of prebiotics, can I add cod liver oil instead? and add some organic juice for flavor? I need it so that my 22 month LO with cavities will consume cod liver oil, and she likes marshmallows. I am planning to put into practice your advice in naturally healing her cavities. Put she’s just a picky eater. I hope you can help me on this one. Thanks.

  42. Kathryn Grace says

    Hi. I’m always looking for healthier alternatives to feed my grandchildren, and marshmallows are one sweet treat I never buy because, well, you know all the reasons. Thank you for this recipe. So glad to find it! Pinning.

    Don’t know if you’re aware, but all of the links have gone south a bit–their code is showing! Do please let me know when you fix them, as I would like to share this recipe on a couple of sites I play around with.

  43. samantha says

    I just made this recipe. I doubled it, took out the honey and replaced 1 cup with maple syrup (real maple syrup) and then added just half cup of rapadora. They are good. As I poured it into my pan I moved the bowl to cover the pan and they spread themselves a little and immediately started getting hard. No need to spread with spatula. Thanks for the recipe!

  44. Tracy says

    I made these this morning with the marshmallow root. I also used 1/2 tsp of both almond and vanilla extract. These were an immediate hit with my 2 boys and my sceptical husband. Thanks for sharing the recipe. Delish with health benefits, exactly what moms need.

  45. Leah says

    All I’ve got to say is WOW! These turned out wonderful, delicious! Waay better than my old recipe (corn syrup kind) and I don’t feel guilty licking the beater after! I was short 1/4 cup of honey so I used the rest maple syrup an still was good! Thank you so much!!

  46. Ashley says

    I cannot wait to try this recipe! I have been searching EVERYWHERE for marshmallows that are full of sugar and other junk. I have been looking at all different types of healthier options (I’m new to making things homemade, organic, nonGMO, etc but I’m learning!) We’re getting ready to take a vacation to Disney World and I’m terrified of being stuck with my family and forced to eat and follow with their unhealthy lifestyles. I am working so hard on finding natural, organic, whole yummy foods for myself and my son. I come to your page everyday (I’ve even got my husband checking out your recipes!) as well as the coconut mama.

  47. Sofia says

    Just wondering if I could use only 1/2 the honey? I have tried another recipe similar that had a whole cup of sweetener and it was to sweet for us. Would it turn out the same? Or would I need to decrease something else? Thank you, excited to try this… Love using the marshmallow infusion.

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